Monday, February 9, 2009

In the Limelight - Simmons, Kearney and Abercrombie

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Everybody's been talking about Drood these days. "Drood" is the new novel by Dan Simmons, mastermind behind many prestigious award-winning novels, such as Hyperion (one of my all-time favorites), Ilium, Carrion Comfort, Song of Kali and others. His opus spans genres, from science fiction and fantasy to horror, mysteries and thrillers (often within the same novel). His 2007 novel "The Terror" made a (lifelong) fan out of Trin as well.
Drood is being officially released later today (February 9) both in US and UK, and me&Trin are both eager to read it. If you are wondering about the meaning of the word 'Drood'; "The Mysteries of Edward Drood" is the final novel by Charles Dickens that was left unfinished at the time of his death and thus the fate of the main protagonist remains undisclosed. Simmons' "Drood" draws heavily on historical facts about Dickens to create an engaging narrative, but spices it with fictional elements, just as he did with "The Terror". And the word on the street is that it's terrific.

The other interesting news that I've come across - thanks to our fellow blogger Adam (The Wertzone) - is that Paul Kearney signed a deal with Solaris for two more books set in the world of "The Ten Thousand". Early titles are "Corvus" and "Kings of Morning". This sounds very promising, since Kearny will be given a chance to expand on the sometimes scetchy world of the Macth. At the moment I'm reading and enjoying "This Forsaken Earth" which is the sequel to [...]the very decent, but short of brilliant[...] "The Mark of Ran". A bit of advice for those who don't like to start reading unfinished series , the final book in "Sea Beggars trilogy" was written, but never released, due to the fall out with his publisher at the time. The good news is, though, that Kearny's new publisher, Solaris, supports him to finish the project, but they have to wait for the rights to the books that Bantam US is clinging to to expire, before they can give the green light for the final volume which is to be realeased in an omnibus together with the first two books.

Last but not least: a while ago I've written about the fabulous UK cover for "Best Served Cold", the upcoming novel by Joe Abercrombie, one of the most recognizable names of the new wave of epic fantasy writers, due to be released this summer. Every since the US cover leaked out, there have been heated debates over the blogosphere whether they are any good or not (I tend to agree with the argument that the UK cover looks superior by far): A Dribble of Ink: part 1 & part 2, Grasping for the Wind, Fantasy Book News & Reviews, Dark Wolf's Fantasy Reviews, Pat's Fantasy Hotlist to name just a few. Orbit responded to the tirade in this article, revealing all the pruposed covers, giving insight into their creative process and explaining their pick, which is all very considerate and nice, but that doesn't change the fact the cover doesn't look any prettier for it. I might be too harsh to the US cover, I've seen plenty worse, but when you have something to compare it to, well... you can't help but wonder. But I leave you decide for yourself:
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US Cover -------- vs. -------- UK Cover

9 Comments:

SparklingBlue said...

I like both covers equally well, to be honest.

ThRiNiDiR said...

I like your blog's layout SparklingBlue :).

It's great that you like them both, I've never said that people shouldn't like the US cover. It shows that Orbit's been at least partly successful at reaching out to the potential buyers, but talking from my perspective only, I hate what they've done with it. It's not so much ugly as it is unfortunate; the UK cover has a theme and symmetry, but in the US version half of the cover is ripped away so a 'pretty' female (warrior) in leather clothing could be crammed in there. I have nothing against pretty women on covers, but sometimes the intent is just too obvious. But to be totally honest, the UK cover, although great looking, looks too much alike the cover for "The Blade Itself". The US cover is still leagues better than the covers for the Malazan series though...

Harrison Holtz said...

I think the U.S. cover looks horrible. U.K. is much better.

I was ecstatic when I read about Paul Kearney's book deal to expand the Macht world. What I found especially intriguing is how Kearney mentioned that the world is actually more Science Fiction in nature then Fantasy. So it'll be interesting to see how he explains the science fiction aspects of the world in his upcoming novels.

Trin said...

If the SF premise behind the curtains of 100%fantasy story, then try out "The Inferior" by Paedar O'Guillin. I've written a review a while back. It's not so somber as Kearney, but almost as enjoyable.

Dannie said...

just got my copy of drood! cant wait to read it!

ThRiNiDiR said...

let us know what u think ;)

Ilac Venus said...

I like the US version cover. It entices me to buy the book.

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Mary Walker said...

The UK cover is much better, I like the general background very much, it reminds some old yellowed map, and the dagger looks perfectly natural. It impresses much more than the US one, maybe I just don’t like this girl’s unnatural portrayal. I’ll use the info for my essay writing.

thesis writing said...

t's not so much ugly as it is unfortunate; the UK cover has a theme and symmetry, but in the US version half of the cover is ripped away so a 'pretty' female.

 

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